60 Years ago today: On 22 June 1962 an Air France Boeing 707-328 crashed near Pointe a Pitre, Guadeloupe; killing all 112 occupants.

Date:Friday 22 June 1962
Time:04:03
Type:Silhouette image of generic B703 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Boeing 707-328
Operator:Air France
Registration:F-BHST
MSN:18247/274
First flight:1962-02-23 (4 months)
Engines:Pratt & Whitney JT4A-
Crew:Fatalities: 10 / Occupants: 10
Passengers:Fatalities: 103 / Occupants: 103
Total:Fatalities: 113 / Occupants: 113
Aircraft damage:Destroyed
Aircraft fate:Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:25 km (15.6 mls) WNW of Pointe-à-Pitre-Le Raizet Airport (PTP) (   Guadeloupe)
Crash site elevation:427 m (1401 feet) amsl
Phase:Approach (APR)
Nature:International Scheduled Passenger
Departure airport:Santa Maria-Vila do Porto Airport, Azores (SMA/LPAZ), Portugal
Destination airport:Pointe-à-Pitre-Le Raizet Airport (PTP/TFFR), Guadeloupe
Flightnumber:AF117

Narrative:
A Boeing 707-328, operated by Air France, was destroyed when it crashed into a hillside near Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe. All 113 on board were killed.
The aircraft, named “Chateau de Chantilly”, operated flight 117 from Paris-Orly (France) to Santiago (Chile) with en route stops at Lisbon (Portugal), Santa Maria (Azores), Pointe-à-Pitre (Guadeloupe), Caracas (Venezuela), Bogotá (Colombia) and Lima (Peru).
The VOR at Le Raizet Airport was unserviceable when the flight approached Guadeloupe at night. Weather conditions were poor; a violent thunderstorm existed in the area and visibility was 10 km and a ceiling of 1000 feet within the squall. The crew reported over the NDB at 5000 feet and carried out a turn back towards the east to begin its final approach. Incorrect ADF indications, as a result of the thunderstorm, caused the plane to stray 15 km off the procedural let-down track. The Boeing 707 then crashed into a forest on a hill at an altitude of about 1400 feet.
Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: 1) Breakdown of the VOR; 2) insufficient meteorological information given to the crew; 3) the atmospheric effects on the ADF indicator.